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Courses

History Course Descriptions

HS 211 STUDIES IN U.S. CULTURE AND SOCIETY 2 credits
In this course the student examines the relationships among human behavior, cultural expressions, and the social environment during a specific era of U.S. history. Emphasis is placed on the student critically analyzing historical monographs, historical documents, cultural artifacts and artistic works to construct and effectively communicate her own understanding and interpretation of aspects of an era of U.S. history.

HS 212 STUDIES IN EUROPEAN CULTURE AND SOCIETY 2 credits
In this course the student examines the relationships among human behavior, cultural expressions, and the social environment during a specific era of European history. Emphasis will be placed on the student critically analyzing historical monographs, historical documents, cultural artifacts and artistic works to construct and effectively communicate her own understanding and interpretation of an era of European history.

HS 213 U.S. WOMEN'S RIGHTS AND LIVES 2 credits
In this course the student employs a thematic and chronological approach to United States women's history in an effort to better understand the changes that have occurred in the lives and rights of women from the founding of the republic in the eighteenth century to the present day.  It is obvious that the rights of women did not follow the same path as the rights of men in the United States, but students will also evaluate how the work and political lives of women changed over time in ways that were at various times in tandem with and divergent from those of men. 

HS 250 ANCIENT WORLD CULTURES AND CIVILIZATIONS 4 credits
This course will provide students with a chronological and thematic approach to world history from prehistoric times to 1500 C.E. By examining the first civilizations more than five thousand years ago as well as succeeding civilizations, students will learn that many of the institutions, practices, and beliefs of their own society today are not universal and unchanging, but were devised gradually to meet particular needs. A sense of how the world happened to evolve, and particularly how different cultures of the world took different approaches to understanding and dealing with the common problems of living, will help students temper their assumptions about the universality and inevitability of their lives today.

HS 251 MAKING OF THE MODERN WORLD 4 credits
This course provides the student with a chronological and thematic approach to world history since the mid-18th Century. She learns how people from a variety of cultures and nation-states have shaped and responded to common challenges, developments, and events in the past and uses that historical understanding to increase her understanding of the contemporary world.

HS 308 THE UNITED STATES HISTORY, 1607 - 1900 4 credits
In a chronological overview of American history from colonial times to 1900, the student examines a number of important themes and topics in the growth of the United States. Fulfills the Wisconsin requirement for certification in early childhood, elementary and secondary education.

HS 309 THE UNITED STATES IN THE 20TH CENTURY 4 credits
A survey of 20th century America with particular emphasis on the maturation of an urban/industrial society; the impact of race and ethnicity; the changing nature of American democracy; and the rise of the United States as a world power. Fulfills the Wisconsin requirement for certification in early childhood, elementary and secondary education.

HS 310 IMMIGRATION AND RACE IN MODERN EUROPE 2 credits
In this course the student studies the worldviews that impact the experience of immigration in the European context. The course compares different European host societies and different immigrant and minority populations, across historical epochs, and from a range of points of view on race and immigration to encourage students to recognize that what people know to be "true" is a particular perspective of the world.

HS 312 IMAGES AND IDENTITIES OF THE NATIVE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE 2 credits
In this course students engage in a comparative study of the First People from two specific regions and time frames. They consider ways that spirituality, mythology and a sense of place, technological change, cultural interdependence, and confrontation shape perspective and influenced decision-making among Native People and the emerging Euro-American culture.

HS 355 CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES ON THE AMERICAN PAST 4 Credits
Through the examination and evaluation of diverse and conflicting narratives about significant themes and issues in American history, the student enters into the critical process by which historians debate and refine our collective understanding of America's past. The specific focus of the course will vary from year to year.

HS 375 HISTORICAL ANALYSIS 4 Credits
The student examines the ways in which historians use theoretical frameworks and methodologies to interpret the past. She develops the ability to judge the effectiveness of the use of theory in research and creates her own independent interpretation of the past with a conscious regard for the way her own theories and assumptions influence her interpretation of historical evidence.

HS 411, 412, 413. TOPICS IN AMERICAN, EUROPEAN OR WORLD HISTORY 4 Credits
This independent readings course concentrates on a variety of themes, periods, or concepts within American, European or World history.  Specific content varies from semester to semester depending on the student's interest and in consultation with their faculty mentor.

HS 451 CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES ON THE EARLY MODERN WORLD, 1370-1750 4 Credits
By evaluating diverse and conflicting approaches to early modern world history, the student studies the historical debates that inform our collective understanding of the past. The student examines how dominant historical interpretations shape our understanding of early modern global history and how historians’ new approaches to this field have led to significant reinterpretation of this period.

HS 475 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH 4 Credits
The student identifies and defines a problem of meaning and interest to herself as a historian and, with the direction of the history faculty, develops a research plan. She must develop theoretical frameworks, conduct the research, and present in narrative form her results to the faculty in an appropriate forum.

HUM 150 EXPRESSIONS AND INTERPRETATIONS OF HUMAN EXPERIENCE 4 Credits
The student explores the basic human value questions that artistic works address and that also find expression in related humanistic works of history, religious studies, and philosophy.  She is introduced to the process of teh various humanities disiplines as ways of approaching human experience. 

HUM 350 SERIES: Studies in Civilization and Culture 4 Credits
This series of courses includes: 

HUM 351 Studies in Civilization and Culture: China

HUM 352 Studies in Civilization and Culture: South Asia

HUM 353 Studies in Civilization and Culture: Latin America

HUM 354 Studies in Civilization and Culture: Africa

HUM 355 Studies in Civilization and Culture: Japan

HUM 356 Studies in Civilization and Culture: Latin America (in Spanish)

HUM 357 Studies in Civilization and Culture: The Two Koreas

HUM 358 Studies in Civilization and Culture: The Middle East

HUM 410 SENIOR HUMANITIES SEMINAR 4 Credits
The student explores fundamental issues in the arts and humanities.  She articulates a personal credo regarding the place of the arts and humanities in her life.  This involves brining the methodologies and skills of individual humanistic disciplines to bear on larger interdisciplinary questions and issues.