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Philosophy Outcomes

STATEMENT OF REQUIRED LEARNING FOR A MAJOR IN PHILOSOPHY

An Alverno College graduate with a major in philosophy has demonstrated the ability:

  • to use persistent question-asking as a method in reading a text, respond to the ideas of others, and explore the complexity of issues;
  • to  use consistency and logic as tools in developing/following the argument/discussion of selected philosophers;
  • to use the ideas of philosophers and other thinkers in addressing personal, professional, and broader social questions;
  • to  identify the culturally grounded assumptions underlying the ideas of philosophers/thinkers and one's own response to those ideas;
  • to analyze ideas in relation to their context and raise questions about one's own ideas and context on the basis of that analysis;
  • to show how experience and interpretations of experience have multiple layers of meaning; see beyond the literal and obvious to the more subtle and complex; practice comfort with ambiguity, uncertainty, loose ends;
  • to approach philosophical questions as matters of personal significance; and
  • to articulate the ways in which one will continue to explore philosophical questions and how that process relates to the rest of one's life.

 STATEMENT OF REQUIRED LEARNING FOR A SUPPORT AREA IN PHILOSOPHY

An Alverno College graduate with a major in philosophy has demonstrated the ability:

  • to use persistent question-asking as a method in reading a text, respond to the ideas of others, and explore the complexity of issues;
  • to  use consistency and logic as tools in developing/following the argument/discussion of selected philosophers;
  • to use the ideas of philosophers and other thinkers in addressing personal, professional, and broader social questions;
  • to  identify the culturally grounded assumptions underlying the ideas of philosophers/thinkers and one's own response to those ideas;
  • to analyze ideas in relation to their context and raise questions about one's own ideas and context on the basis of that analysis;
  • to show how experience and interpretations of experience have multiple layers of meaning; see beyond the literal and obvious to the more subtle and complex; practice comfort with ambiguity, uncertainty, loose ends;
  • to approach philosophical questions as matters of personal significance; and
  • to articulate the ways in which one will continue to explore philosophical questions and how that process relates to the rest of one's life.

 

 

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